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Non-Carnivorous Plants

Ferns, flowering plants, freaks of nature; they may not eat insects but these plants are strange and beautiful enough in their own right!
*Remember: to order, please compile a list of items of interest and send it via the order form on the main sales page or the methods on the Contact page to confirm availability and finalize details.

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Hylocereus undatus -$20

The white Dragon Fruit is a tropical vining cactus with angular succulent stems lined with relatively soft spines. Adult plants may produce large, colorful layered flowers, and fruit is uniquely shaped, bright pink with green scales and with a flavor, texture, and even seeds reminiscent of a kiwi.

Available plants range from 6-14 inches in length.

CAUTION: DRAGON FRUIT VINES BREAK EASILY WHEN TRANSPLANTED AND IN TRANSIT. SHIPPED PLANTS MAY ARRIVE IN SEVERAL SECTIONS, ALL OF WHICH PROPERLY CARED FOR SHOULD BE EASILY ROOTED AND GROWN IN MODERATELY MOIST SOIL.

Pinellia pedatisecta -$8

This is an aroid for beginners, a weedy little plant that spreads rapidly both via daughter tubers and rapidly sprouting seeds. Leaves reach about a foot and a half high and a foot across, spreading in a pinwheel-type pattern of leaflets, and flowers are regularly produced when fed well, up to a foot high and slender, pale green, with a very long spindly spadix. The aroma I liken to that of nail polish remover, an odd chemical sort one would not expect from a flower.

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Amorphophallus konjac "typical" -$8

The classic corpse flower, one of the easiest species for people wanting to grow this unusual genus and fittingly showy to boot. Leaves may reach nearly 6 feet high and almost as wide, the petioles dotted in light green spots over a deeper lime peel background and the leaflets numerous and rich deep green. Flowers are produced typically in early spring on mature tubers (1 pound or more in weight), growing from 3-6 feet tall. The spathe and spadix themselves compose approximately a third of that height, shades of deep maroon-purple and rich in a potent aroma that earns the "corpse flower" title. 

Available tuber offsets are currently 1-3" in diameter, and may take a couple of years to mature.

Amorphophallus symonianus -$12

This relatively small species develops leaves up to 2 feet tall, with light and dark green dotted petioles and moderately sized leaflets. Flowers arise from mature bulbs and are up to a foot tall, with a hooded white spathe and notably "phallic" shaped creamy white spadix. The odor is relatively undescribed, but reportedly unpleasant like so many in this genus. This species is one of several that instead of producing tuber offshoots reproduce via bulbils formed in the crux of the leaf as it begins to age.

Available sets are leaf bulbils approximately 1.5" in diameter, and may take a couple of years to mature.